How other countries affirm human dignity

dignity Sep 01, 2020

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1KeAZho8TKo]

Michael Moore's 2015 documentary Where to Invade Next isn't about America's war history. It's about how other countries affirm human dignity through policy. It's a look at how policy shapes culture and creates cultures of "we," where people look out for their neighbors, instead of cultures of "me." For example:

  • In Germany, it's illegal for a boss to contact his or her subordinates while they're on vacation.
  • In Slovenia, it's normal for students to protest when administrators threaten their tuition-free higher education.
  • In Norway, prison guards use conversation instead of violence and humiliation. The maximum sentence is 21 years, and Norway has one of the lowest murder rates in the world.

Explains Wikipedia:

The countries and topics in order of appearance:

  • Italy: labor rights and workers' well-being: paid holiday, paid honeymoon, thirteenth salary, two-hour lunch breaks, paid parental leave
  • France: school meals and...
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Workplace abuse is theft

"Someone in your office walks out every day with a laptop under his coat. He fences them down the street and keeps the money. After he's discovered, how long should he keep his job? What if he's a really hard worker? Perhaps you give him a warning, but when he's discovered stealing again a week from now, then what? Bullying costs far more than laptop theft does," says Marketing Guru Seth Godin in his blog post "Bullying is theft."

Bullying is "intentionally using power to cause physical or emotional distress with the purpose of dominating the other person," says Godin. "The bully works to marginalize people. In an organizational setting, the bully chooses not to engage in conversation or discussion or to use legitimate authority or suasion and depends instead on pressure in the moment to demean and disrespect someone else — by undermining not just their ideas but their very presence and legitimacy."

Most bullies aren't sociopaths, immune to correction. They are...

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How to find your purpose

joy purpose Aug 27, 2020

"I would rather flirt with failure than never dance with my joy," says author Wes Moore, who appeared on the Oprah Winfrey Network talking about his book The Work, about finding your path to purpose. In the interview, Moore says that what you would do regardless of work is what your purpose is and what should be your life's work.

Oprah is joined by decorated veteran, entrepreneur, Rhodes scholar, and New York Times best-selling author Wes Moore for an inspirational conversation about discovering and pursuing your life’s purpose. Wes shares the lessons he learned as a combat officer in Afghanistan, a White House Fellow, and a Wall Street banker during the financial crisis. He opens up about his journey of self-discovery, service, and risk-taking that led him to walk away from financial success to create a more meaningful life for him and his family. Wes and Oprah also discuss his new book, The Work, which calls on readers to find their own paths to purpose.

Watch the...

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How to know if you might have PTSD after workplace abuse

Workplace abuse can often lead to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). According to the Mayo Clinic, "symptoms may start within three months of a traumatic event, but sometimes symptoms may not appear until years after the event. These symptoms cause significant problems in social or work situations and in relationships."

PTSD symptoms are generally grouped into four types:

Intrusive memories

Symptoms of intrusive memories may include:

  • Recurrent, unwanted distressing memories of the traumatic event
  • Reliving the traumatic event as if it were happening again (flashbacks)
  • Upsetting dreams about the traumatic event
  • Severe emotional distress or physical reactions to something that reminds you of the event

Avoidance

Symptoms of avoidance may include:

  • Trying to avoid thinking or talking about the traumatic event
  • Avoiding places, activities, or people that remind you of the traumatic event

Negative changes in thinking and mood

Symptoms of negative changes in thinking and mood may...

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Why going to HR generally doesn't help targets of workplace abuse

Targets of workplace abuse have told me that when they reported their experiences to Human Resources, the workplace abuse generally got worse. Advocates said:

HR is there to protect a company's legal interests, not the worker. As soon as a you go to HR [about workplace abuse], you can expect things to get worse because you have just given them notice they need to get their ducks in a row and get rid of you so you can't document anymore. It's better to quietly go to an employment lawyer who will tell you if you have a case, tell you how to document, and act as your advocate when you have a viable case.

HR gets their paycheck from the company, not you. They are not your advocate.

Going to Human Resources can be as effective as doing nothing, if not worse.

It is important to note that many HR professionals are targets of workplace abuse themselves.

What do you do instead? Advocates most commonly reported that leaving the organization was the most effective (and often the...

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Signs your toxic boss is subtly destroying your life

Work culture is top-down. So if those at the top believe passive-aggressive behaviors will help weed out bad employees, then you're at the mercy of abusive bosses who master the art of subtle abuse. And subtle abuse gets rewarded. "Research by the University of Buffalo School of Management finds that ... those who engage in harassment typically receive excellent reviews from their own supervisors and are exceptional at climbing the corporate ladder," says Glynis Sweeny in her Alternet article "8 traits of toxic managers."

The problem is that at best, you're left feeling shamed, isolated, drained, and fearful of losing your job. At worst, your abusive boss ruins your career, makes you question your value at work, and takes a toll on your personal life and health, leaving you with anxiety, depression, and suicidal thoughts.

Sweeny points to these eight cues that you have an abusive boss:

1. They don’t give constructive feedback. Good managers want you to...

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What to do — and not do — if you're abused at work

What do those who've experienced workplace abuse recommend to those still in it? Get out. Nothing you can do will stop the abuse.
 
What to avoid
Targets who stood up to workplace abuse, even with plenty of documentation, reported outcomes they said "weren't worth it":
  • Thousands of dollars in legal fees
  • Mental and emotional exhaustion
  • Health problems: sleeplessness, anxiety, and chest pains
  • Bad effects on family and other personal relationships
What to do
Former targets recommended making your well-being the number one priority:
  • Take medical leave
  • See a therapist
Ultimately, remember it's not you who is in the wrong.
 
 
 
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How businesses lose when they keep a bully on payroll

Those who've been abused at work say that abusers didn't just harm their health and personal relationships. Abusers actually harmed their organizations. Here's how:
  • Employees lose trust in employers who protect abusers. When they lose trust, their morale and productivity go down.
  • Productivity also decreases when great employees focus on fear of more abuse.
  • Employees lose money from absenteeism and turnover (not the kind that results from employers no longer needing certain skills), which costs organization big bucks in training.
  • Since great employees leave their organizations when abused, companies lose employees who would have helped build a better company.

When costs go up for organizations, taxpayers lose, too. Health care costs get externalized, costs that the employer would have been responsible for. 

No one wins when managers abuse employees.

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Yet another study links workplace abuse to suicides. When is enough enough?

I reported earlier that a Norwegian study revealed that abused targets are twice as likely to have suicidal thoughts than those who were never abused. Pioneer Heinz Leymann estimated that 10 percent of those bullied take their lives.

Researchers defined bullying as harassment, badgering, and freezing out that generally:

  • Occurred repeatedly over a period of time.
  • Involved two parties in which one had a higher ranking than the other.

It happens so often that there’s now a term for it. “Bullycide” happens when the cause of suicide is attributable to the victim having been bullied.

Now researchers in Australia report similar findings. Australian researchers determined that workplace bullying or harassment was associated with 1.54 greater odds of suicide ideation.


How workplace abuse can lead any of us to suicide (“bullycide”)

Findings show that none of us have a thick enough skin to be exempt from the workplace...

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Budget-friendly tips for starting a home-based business

By Amy Collett

Are you thinking about starting a business out of your home? If so, you probably know about the many advantages of using your home as a business headquarters, such as lower overhead costs, no commute, and flexibility in schedule.

But to reap the benefits, you must prepare and strategize your home-based business the right way. Otherwise, you will find it hard to succeed in the short term, much less the long term. Below are some practical, budget-friendly tips to help you start a home-based business on solid ground.

Consider Business Financing

First of all, it’s hard to start a business when you don’t have a lot of cash flow. To help reduce stress and give yourself solid footing as you launch your business, look into your options with small business funding. That way, you can get assistance to get any new equipment, inventory, additional staff, and other things that will help you get a good start.

Research government funding options, such as traditional SBA...

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